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saintswhodi 07-19-2005 08:46 AM

Los Angeles looks like a dry market
 
Quote:

Los Angeles looks like a dry market
By Jeff Reynolds (jreynolds@pfwmedia.com)
July 11, 2005





Two teams — the Rams and Raiders — were too much for the No. 2 television market in the United States to support. Different scenarios led both out of Los Angeles following the 1994 NFL season, and there hasn’t been a professional football team in the city on a full-time basis since.

But if commissioner Paul Tagliabue and the other 32 owners get their way, that’s all about to change. The NFL’s goal is to return a team to La-La Land by 2008.

Which, of course, leads to the biggest question: Why?

We all know the bottom-line, simple answer is money. Market size equals earnings potential equals profit for a league rolling in the dough and eager for ways to establish itself further as our country’s top sport. What has been ignored during the league’s push to get in the red zone with a potential stadium site in L.A. is that, although the league has missed Los Angeles, the city hasn’t missed the NFL.

Sure, there are diehard football fans in and around the city, over to Orange County and in spots recognized as Raiders, Chargers or 49ers country. But the simple fact is that the California populace doesn’t seem to want or need the NFL as dearly as Tagliabue and his owners appear to need a fourth team in the state.

In 2004, Tagliabue began an all-out push to let Los Angeles know it was wanted by the NFL and hardly forgotten. He said professional football returning there by 2008 was his goal. Since then, Tagliabue and the owners have been more realistic. They aren’t stuck on 2008 and don’t consider it so much a deadline as an optimistic target that would be nice to hit.

With the wheels toward expansion turning, potential owners have popped up. One is Larry Ellison, co-founder of computer software company Oracle. Ellison could match blank checks with Mark Cuban, but being based in San Francisco, Ellison has never put the full-court press on the league about bringing a team to L.A. Instead, Ellison is one of several ownership groups with some level of interest.

Part of the reason no one is ready to throw green at the prospects of bringing an NFL team back to the area is that the league hasn’t staked out a piece of real estate for any future club to call home. A few proposed sites, such as Carson and Pasadena, have taken themselves out of the running. Carson residents instead decided they really wanted a multimillion-dollar mall project more than they wanted pro football. Pasadena recently decided to spend more than $125,000 to research non-NFL alternatives for its Rose Bowl site.

These moves may have been more a concession to the favored heavyweight sites — the Los Angeles Coliseum, which the Raiders once called home, and Anaheim. The Rams played in Anaheim Stadium, which has been dramatically redesigned and refurbished for use as strictly a baseball stadium by the Angels of Major League Baseball. But with a wealthy Orange County fan base, plus its proximity to Los Angeles, many believe this to be the NFL’s preferred site. Such a move, however, could be contingent on that area building a new football-only facility, and, given the area’s love-hate relationship with the sport and its teams, that appears to be a significant hurdle.

Which brings us back to the original question: Why football in L.A.? Bean counters in the NFL’s home office in New York understand that they have a product peaking in popularity and want to extend the brand in all ways possible. Football, American style, goes to Tokyo and Mexico City once a year and will branch further by 2006 or 2007. For it to reach L.A. by 2008, a lot has to change.

As the Los Angeles Times reported in early June, football isn’t for everyone. The Times reported that Pasadena Councilman Steve Haderlein was met with deafening applause that disrupted a four-hour city council meeting with this statement: “My view of the NFL deal as it currently stands is that it’s not a good one for Pasadena.�

Something tells me Tagliabue wasn’t listening.

Find a new angle Tom.

http://profootballweekly.com/PFW/Com...olds071105.htm

Euphoria 07-19-2005 09:25 AM

RE: Los Angeles looks like a dry market
 
I mean why wouldn't you have a team in LA the number 2 market in the country? I think its a lot harder to move a team and build a fan base than you might expect especially in a state/area where there are 3 football teams, 3 basketball teams... and others. There is a lot to do in this state as far as entertainment goes and people in this country tend to be born into a teams fanbase for whatever reason. People in CA have already drawn the line... Charger, 49ers, and diehard Raidernation. I think the NFL is going to be hard pressed to bring in a team and have overnight success. There was problems with other teams in the city and your still going to have that. LA just doesn't role out the red carpet for the NFL.

4saintspirit 07-19-2005 09:43 AM

There has to be something to the fact that they could not and would not support the Raiders and Rams -- The Raiders are a very popular and nationally known team -- the Rams has a long history in California -- both failed -- Face it = Californians are not like the rest of the country -- with the weather -- the beaches -- the mountains -- etc - football is not the highest priority ---

saintz08 07-19-2005 10:29 AM

Quote:

There has to be something to the fact that they could not and would not support the Raiders and Rams
Los Angeles is a Mexican city
says Mayor Hahn

* * *
"Our city is a Mexican city, and Mexican Americans have greatly shaped
our cultural, political and commercial landscape."
Los Angeles Mayor James K. Hahn
November 5, 2001

* * *

by
Miroslava Flores
La Voz de Aztlan

MEXICO CITY - November 6, 2001 - (ACN) Los Angeles Mayor James K. Hahn met with Mexican President Vicente Fox on Monday at the presidential home at Los Pinos. The two leaders met for the first time to begin forging a closer and more practical working relationship. This is Mayor Hahn's first foreign trade mission and the first official visit of a Los Angeles mayor to Mexico in almost a decade. The meeting highlighted the growing ties between California and Mexico. Mayor Hahn reaffirmed Mexico's interwoven history with that of Los Angeles, which was once governed by Mexico.

Mexican-Americans have been warming up to Kenneth Hahn ever since he defeated the corrupt Chicano candidate Tony Villar (aka Antonio Villargairoza) who was implicated in the "prison pardon scandal" of the notorious crack cocaine dealer Carlos Vignali. Tony Villar was a lackey of the westside L.A. Jewish community who failed to convinced many in the Mexican-American community that he was the right man for the job. The small Afro-American community overwhelmingly rejected Villar but he managed to receive over 80% of the gay and lesbian vote of the West Hollywood community.

Mayor Hahn was treated to the best of Mexican hospitality and as a major foreign dignitary. His meeting with the Mexican president was a rare honor for an American mayor. Hahn was given the royal treatment and escorted around the Mexican capital in a heavily protected motorcade. Mayor Hahn was accompanied by Marta Lara, the Mexican consul general to Los Angeles; Jeffrey Davidow, the U.S. ambassador to Mexico; and Los Angeles City Councilmen Alex Padilla. Alex Padilla is an up and coming young Mexican- American leader who was recently elected as president of the city council by his peers.

Mayor Hahn's principal mission was to forge a better business relationship with Mexico. The mayor said, "We think Mexico is our best customer, and we are Mexico's best customer." Mexico is second only to China as Los Angeles' largest trading partner. California exported $19-billion worth of goods to the country last year.

It appears that Mexican-Americans have a good friend in the mayor's office. This was demonstrated by the mayor's emphasis that he and other California leaders welcome Mexican immigrants. He stated to the Mexican media that California does not want to be remembered only for Proposition 187 which denied health and educational benefits to Mexican immigrants. He said, "I think the message is we're looking for more opportunities to strengthen friendships."

The mayor told Mexican officials that he wants to be a strong advocate for immigrant rights in California. Mayor Hahn informed Fox that he called Governor Davis several times in recent months to urge him to support two bills that would assist Mexicans living in the state. One will allow children of immigrants to pay state tuition to attend California colleges, and another would permit immigrants applying for legal status to receive driver's licenses.

Mayor Kenneth Hahn is also learning to speak Spanish. At a Mexico City news conference, Hahn recited in Spanish his support for an amnesty program for guest workers and undocumented immigrants, an issue that has been shelved by federal officials since the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.

http://aztlan.net/hahnmexico.htm

saintz08 07-19-2005 10:37 AM

Villaraigosa Sworn In As Los Angeles Mayor
For the first time in more than a century, the city of Los Angeles has an Hispanic chief executive.

In front of thousands of dignitaries and well-wishers, former California Assembly Speaker Antonio Villaraigosa, 52, was sworn in as the 41st mayor of Los Angeles Friday, pledging to serve as a mayor "for all the people."

Villaraigosa, who took the oath of office in front of City Hall from U.S. Ninth Circuit Court Judge Stephen R. Reinhardt, is the first Latino mayor of Los Angeles since 1872.

During a 33-minute address, Villaraigosa, who defeated incumbent mayor James Hahn in a May run-off election, reaffirmed his commitment to many of his main campaign issues, including education, gang violence and the city's traffic system. "I'm asking you to dream with me," Villaraigosa said, who offered visions of a new Los Angeles where "every Angeleno has a stake in the city's future."

Villaraigosa told the crowd that public school reform will be the most important area of attention for his administration. According to city figures, one-third of all Los Angeles students drop out of school without graduating.

Among the political luminaries in attendance for the ceremony were former Vice President Al Gore, Oakland mayor Jerry Brown, former Los Angeles mayors Hahn and Richard Riordan, as well as Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger. Villaraigosa quickly stepped in to quiet a handful of boos when Schwarzenegger's name was announced, instructing the crowd the day would continue with civility.

http://www.news10.net/storyfull1.asp?id=11801

Euphoria 07-19-2005 12:43 PM

I don't know if the teams failed but more so just lacked the major success finiacially they had hoped for... I do have to tell ya taxes and cost of living in CA is HIGH... you can do better else where with the same ammout of people going to the games.

Euphoria 07-20-2005 09:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 4saintspirit
There has to be something to the fact that they could not and would not support the Raiders and Rams -- The Raiders are a very popular and nationally known team -- the Rams has a long history in California -- both failed -- Face it = Californians are not like the rest of the country -- with the weather -- the beaches -- the mountains -- etc - football is not the highest priority ---

Well being from California myself I'll have to disagree with you. There are diehards out here that live and breath football. The problem is that you can't move the Raiders up to LA... you aren't going to increase the Raiders fan base by doing so at all. You're either a Raiders fan here or you're not. Cost of living is a killer here... most part of the country you can buy a 3 beedroom house for say 150,000-200,000, here you'll pay for the same house 600,000 to a million dollars easily.

4saintspirit 07-20-2005 10:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Euphoria
Quote:

Originally Posted by 4saintspirit
There has to be something to the fact that they could not and would not support the Raiders and Rams -- The Raiders are a very popular and nationally known team -- the Rams has a long history in California -- both failed -- Face it = Californians are not like the rest of the country -- with the weather -- the beaches -- the mountains -- etc - football is not the highest priority ---

Well being from California myself I'll have to disagree with you. There are diehards out here that live and breath football. The problem is that you can't move the Raiders up to LA... you aren't going to increase the Raiders fan base by doing so at all. You're either a Raiders fan here or you're not. Cost of living is a killer here... most part of the country you can buy a 3 beedroom house for say 150,000-200,000, here you'll pay for the same house 600,000 to a million dollars easily.

I guess my point is that why wouldn't the people in LA become fans now that they are in LA. And what would the difference be if another team moved there -- bottom line is that 2 teams moved out of LA after being wooed to go there -- what makes this year different

Euphoria 07-20-2005 10:53 AM

I said previously... that there are many problems with moving a team to LA with 3 teams in the state as it is. I feel being a fan just doesn't happen over night. Moving the Raiders mad no sense to me but powers that be saw a chance to increase the fan base... keeping its Raider nation and building those LA fans as well, just didn't happen that way. I don't think there was an increase in fan base because you're either a raider fan or you're not in CA. Oakland is a distance from LA but not that much to make a difference. Lets say you moved a team from Jacksonville or Min even yeah that may have a better chance at success. Don't think that just because two teams left there means they failed. There are factors that made it less attractive to be there is all.

Moving a team like the Raiders who are embedded with the city and its fan base was just a stupid move. Its kind of like the Browns moving to Baltimore, Browns so embedded not only with the fans there but its fans everywheres, outcry brought the Browns back...


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