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WIDE RECEIVERS For the 2007 Draft

this is a discussion within the Saints Community Forum; For the most part, the top five possess good size with all but Ohio State's Ted Ginn Jr. measuring at least 6-foot-2, but it could be interesting to see how teams favor this group. There is a solid foundation of ...

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Old 04-19-2007, 12:29 PM   #1
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WIDE RECEIVERS For the 2007 Draft

For the most part, the top five possess good size with all but Ohio State's Ted Ginn Jr. measuring at least 6-foot-2, but it could be interesting to see how teams favor this group. There is a solid foundation of prospects that could go anywhere between late in the first round all the way down to the third or fourth rounds.
Last season, the NFL Rookie of the Week honors went to a wide receiver on seven different occasions with seventh-round pick Marques Colston and undrafted free agent Hank Baskett accounting for four of those awards. Therefore, expect an early run on receivers.
However, a straying away from the position will allow several high-profile names to still be on the board come the second day of the draft.

TOP WIDE RECEIVERS

1. Calvin Johnson, WR, 6050, 239, 4.35, GT

Potentially the best pound-for-pound athlete in the draft. Calvin allow defenders to get into his body or use their hands to knock him off routes. He is very flexible and has a fluid stride that allows him to separate from defenders. Once in the open field he has great moves that can take a short screen or slant route and deliver big yardage after the catch. Footwork is good as to keeping or getting himself inbounds along the sideline or in the end zone. Very effective as a blocker as he looks for players downfield to block and was able to cut-block defenders with the best of them in college. Very smart and grounded without the ego you see from a lot of wideouts these days.

Will have lapses in concentration and drop balls he shouldn't and has disappeared from some games. He still has some work to do as a route runner and needs to master the finer points. One aspect he could improve upon is breaking off his routes and coming back to the ball, although he needs to do a better job of locating the ball when it is in the air, especially when going to out-jump opposing defenders

Johnson is simply one of the best wide receiver prospects to come along in quite some time and can be a matchup nightmare for defenses. Inconsistent QB play kept him from developing properly. That is a scarry thought. He matches that athleticism with playmaker ability on the field and a quiet unassuming presence off of it. Think Terrell Owens without the attitude
Has been timed in the 4.35 with vertical leap between 42 and 45 inches and a broad jump of 11 feet at 6-5, 239 is scary.

2. Dwayne Bowe Sr., WR, 6022, 221, 4.40, LSU

Bowe primarily lined up at the flanker (Z) receiver spot in order to take advantage of his size. Has very good size with a solid frame and a vast wingspan thus most defenders were unable to get up and jam or press him. With his long arms and big, strong hands to disengage and quickly get into his routes. A long-strider who plays faster than he times that is an excellent leaper with good body control and ball skills. The eye surgery helped him see the ball quicker and catch the majority of passes with his hands outstretched from his body. He breaks most of his tackles with power as opposed to making defenders miss with speed. He is physical and runs pretty well after the catch making him a force in the red zone who has made a lot of big plays during his career. He is an excellent blocker.

Corrective Lasik eye surgery in the offseason helped him produce but he will still juggle or secure a few balls against his body, though. Needs to show better concentration. He is better on intermediate or post routes as opposed to corner or go patterns, and he has ideal size and leaping ability on fade routes. However, he has struggled at times to adjust to the ball, with it falling incomplete or just out of his reach. It takes him time to build up to full speed and needs to become a better route runner. His awareness on the field is not there yet when it comes to identifying coverages.

Did not play football until his junior year of high school and is still raw. Seems to be getting better every year and still has a lot of upside

3. Robert Meachem, WR, 6020, 214, 4.39, Tennesse

This youngster came on this past season thanks to a move from "X" to flanker, where he became the Volunteers' new go-to receiver. He used a combination of size, speed and slippery moves to elevate himself to the upper echelon of receivers. He has a pretty solid build and the frame to bulk up further and he knows how to use it.... Shows some power and he'll break tackles. Robert has long arms, big hands and will snatch the ball out of the air. He catches the ball with his hands and has terrific balance and agility in the open field, where he'll accelerate without losing any of his top-end speed making him a big play threat in the vertical passing game. He had a few drops when trying to adjust to the ball, but he has good leaping skills and sticks his landings along the sideline. Meachem is a red-zone threat especially along the back line of the end zone. He's also a willing blocker and was recognized by teammates as being well-liked and mature.

Drops some balls due to a lack of concentration. Is not very tough or physical so he does not get off the line well versus the jam. Nor will he work across the middle much. He needs time to work on the technique and still has to master the nuances of his craft. Has some minor durability concerns.

The wild card among the receivers, coming off his best season and still has some upside.He's somewhat of a finesse player who has the physical tools you look for, maybe similar to Donte Stallworth

4. Dwayne Jarrett WR 6040, 219, 4.50, USC

A tremendous playmaker at the collegiate level, Jarrett is now being questioned about his ability to keep up that big-play style at the next level. However, there is no doubting his production, size and athletic ability to grab the ball at its highest point. More than willing to make the tough catch in traffic. He does well along the sidelines, looking to create space and tracking the ball well over his shoulder. Excells at coming back to the ball. Has always been clutch in big situations and a terror in the redzone. A solid blocker

Jarrett's has minor character concerns issues that revolve around his lack of ideal straight-line speed, questionable work habits and unwillingness to be coached. He has been accused of slacking off is when he is not the primary target. While his straight-line speed is average for his size and position, the failure to be overly flexible and to cut in and out on his routes is probably a more pressing issue. He needs to get stronger and be more physical because he may have made smaller defenders pay on a consistent basis, but many of those jump ball or fade routes will not be so easy to achieve against NFL defenders. May profile as more of a #2 target at the next level and not a true #1

He needs to be paired with the right type of scheme and position coach in order to get the most out of him. Jarrett is such an interesting prospect because he has produced and consistently made big plays in college. BUT other factors could cause him to slide toward the latter part of the first round. While Hughes' stock is plummeting with his poor showing, Jarrett didn't even attempt to run, instead electing to wait until his March 28 Pro Day. With all of the healthy top ranked receivers turning in impressive workouts in Indianapolis, Jarrett's lack of participation drew plenty of grumbles from NFL scouts. Some have him rated as high as the draft's No. 2 receiver. Others are not impressed by his potential impact in the pros and feel he will slide greatly on draft day.

5. Ted Ginn Jr., 5112, 178, 4.39, WR, Ohio State

The elevation of this versatile performer to a potential spot among the top 10 picks comes from the fact he possesses speed – and more speed. He is likely the fastest player in the draft in terms of straight-line 40-yard dash speed, and he also has the rare athleticism to change direction on a dime without losing any speed. Even rarer is his ability to gear right back up to full speed with a few steps. His fast reflexes and hand/eye coordination have made him the most feared return man in college football.

Ginn needs to learn to get free or create space for himself in the middle of the field. He must work to become more flexible as he can round off his routes at times, and he also needs to increase his bulk/strength in order to defeat press coverage in the pros.

Ginn has started to grow as a receiver, although he is still a bit thin-framed and has too many drops. Right now, he brings the dimension of speed, versatility and game-breaking return skills, but he is not a finished product at receiver. He has also speculated on several occasions that at some point in his pro career he would like to play cornerback, the position he prefers to play.

Not a true #1 target. He will at the very least be a top-notch return man in the pros but might ultimately be more of a #2 or #3 option as a receiver.
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Old 04-19-2007, 12:31 PM   #2
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Round 2 to 3

6. Sidney Rice - 6034, 200, 4.51, S. Carolina

Rice is a first round talent who may slip a bit because of some other wide receivers entering the draft early. A sophomore with excellent size with long arms and a rangy frame that is a smooth natural athlete who had a 72 catches and 10 touchdowns considered a disappointment. If he'd have been playing with a real quarterback last season he could have caught 100 passes. The kid is a excellent leaper who high points the ball and has big, soft, and very reliable hands. Tracks the ball well and has great hand / eye coordination as any WR in the draft. Will make the spectacular catch. Terrific body control, outstanding ball skills and plays faster than he times. Able to separate and is a great vertical threat. A terror in the red zone and was extremely productive and pretty dominant in the SEC.

Doesn't have a lot of experience and still very raw and needs to work on mastering the nuances of the position (route running). Timed speed is only average. Needs to get stronger and could stand to add some weight. Is not real explosive and lacks a burst to provide much after the catch. .Has some durability concerns and battled a number of minor injuries throughout his career.

If he'd have been playing with a real quarterback last season he could have caught 100 passes. A bit of a project who teams will have to be patient with and develop but he certainly has #1 wideout potential at the next level and could ultimately end up being a steal. The key word is potential, but a ton of it.

7. Steve Smith - WR - 5116, 197, 4.44, USC

A smooth natural athlete with good quickness, good body control and reliable hands. Runs excellent routes and knows how to get open and is elusive after the catch. Tough WR that will work across the middle and is an above average blocker. Productive, got better every year and had some big games as a senior. A lot of experience.

Does not play as fast as he times and lacks a explosive burst. Size, strength and bulk are average. Will struggles to separate, won't stretch the field and is not a vertical threat. Was never really the main focus of opposing defenses. Durability is a question as are some character concerns. Doesn't have much upside.

A classic possession receiver who will never be a true #1 target but he can be a very nice #2, #3 or slot and thrive in a complimentary role. Broke his roommate's (Dominique Byrd) jaw in '05

8. Jason Hill - 6005, 218 4.32, Washington State

Natural athlete with nice quickness who timed faster than expected. He has good size with a strong, solid build and plays physical. Jason knows how to use his body with good body control and adjusts well to poorly thrown balls. Hands are big and reliable. Runs good routes and just knows how to get open and is elusive in the open field. Has a nose for the endzone. Was extremely productive and a big play threat.

Does not play up to his timed speed and he will have a considerably tougher time separating from pro corners, espically beating the jam at the line. He is only an average blocker. His concentration and focus have been an issue at times. Fell of as a senior and did not have the great final campaign that most were expecting. An overachiever whose lack of ideal physical tools will become more apparent at the next level.

One of the most prolific wideouts in the college game the past few years. Is not the elite pro prospect his statistics might lead you to believe but he can still be a solid #2 or #3 option.

9. Anthony Gonzalez - 6000, 193, 4.44, Ohio St.

Gonzalez was the less heralded of the Ohio State receivers, but an awfully good rospect in his own right. Adequate height and bulk ratio and good timed speed and quickness. A fantastic route runner who just knows how to get open and has excellent hands. An above average blocker who gives a good effort. Excellent intangibles and a hard worker who's dedicated to being the best player he can be. Is very smart and can also help out as a return man. Still improving, got better every year and has upside.

Only started for one season in college and was never the main focus of defenses attention and did not make many big plays. Has some trouble with physical corners and may have some trouble beating the jam at the line. Doesn't do much after the catch. May never be a true #1 target. The only real negative you can find here is that in the past Anthony has seemed almost disinterested in the NFL, while indicating that he'd like to go to law school

Was used as more of a possession receiver in college and often times worked out of the slot but his physical tools lead you to believe he could be much more. An extremely bright student, Gonzalez is the kind of kid you want to have on your team, it just so happens he also has legit 4.4 speed and good hands. Probably best suited to be a #2 or #3 wideout at the next level...He'll never be a star but will be a valuable contributor.

10.Craig Davis - 6013, 207, 4.41, LSU

Real name is Craig but he goes by "Buster" maybe because he has good size and a solid build. Timed speed is excellent, he has a burst enabling him to be elusive and run well after the catch. Hands are extremely reliable and he adjusts well to poorly thrown balls. Big play threat who can hurt defenses vertically. Holds his own as a blocker. Very athletic and still has a lot of upside. Also a top return man

Needs to improve as a route runner and shys away from contact. Will not sell out to make the catch. Was not overly productive and didn't always play up to his ability in college. He is still somewhat raw and unpolished. Durability is a concern

Played on a very talented team and was overshadowed by Dwayne Bowe at times...Has all the tools you look for in a wideout and could really blossom at the next level if given more of an opportunity.

11. Aundrae Allison - 6001, 192, 4.39, Eastern Carolina

A smooth athlete, with ball skills, balance and body control are rated as superb. Has excellent hands and makes both the routine and tough catches. Speed is good, agility not great, but he plays faster than he times and has a burst. A deep threat who can stretch the field vertically and will work across the middle and in traffic. Very elusive and runs well after the catch. Has potential as a return man.

He only has two years of DI experience. Not a great route runner and needs to pay more attention to detail. Takes plays off and work ethic is a question. Not much of a blocker and isn't very physical or aggressive. Has some durability concerns.

A JUCO All-American at Georgia Military Academy who officially enrolled at East Carolina in Jan. of '05. Might not project to be a true #1 receiver at the pro level but can be an excellent #2 option. Doesn't get a lot of attention but he has quietly emerged as a top pro prospect and how high he goes may surprise most casual observers.

12. Johnnie Lee Higgins - 5112, 183, 4.52, Texas-El Paso

Higgins possesses great open field speed, he has extremely long arms and big hands for a player his size which give him an interesting demographic in the open field. He has a history of making big plays and if put in the right offensive system in the NFL he could absolutely explode. Excellent athlete. He has outstanding speed and is very quick with a burst. Elusive and runs well after the catch Great leaper with good ball skills and body control. Has reliable hands and will snatch the ball out of the air. Tough and plays bigger than he is. He can also contribute as a return man.

Undersized and almost frail. He is not very strong or physical and may struggles to beat the jam. Does not run great routes. May be limited in terms of the roles he can play. Durability's a concern.

Some might not consider him a sleeper pick, but in terms of talent flying under the radar he is exactly that.
Has some physical limitations but a lot of his flaws are correctable and you simply can't teach speed. Probably won't ever be a true #1 target at the pro level
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Old 04-19-2007, 12:34 PM   #3
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4th

13. David Clowney - 6003, 188, 4.36, Virginia Tech

He played in a receiver rotation and dealt with a real shaky quarterback situation which limited his opportunities and somewhat explains his modest statistics. A smooth natural athlete that is very elusive and runs well after the catch. Great quickness and adequate timed speed with a burst with solid hands. Tough for his size and will work across the middle. Height is good and he has the frame to bulk up. Hard worker with sound intangibles. Also has some kick return potential

Has a slight build and is almost frail, so durability is a concern. Is not very physical or aggressive. Needs to get stronger. Has trouble beating the jam. Is not the deep threat you'd think he would be and needs to work on route running. Lacks great ball skills. Upside could be limited at the next level

Does not project to be a #1 wideout in the NFL but can contribute as a #3 or #4 while also helping out on special teams.

14. Dallas Baker - 6031, 208 4.53 Florida

A.k.a. "The Touchdown Maker" has excellent size with long arms and a solid frame. Terrific body control and hands that will snatch the ball out of the air. Knows how to use his body and runs excellent routes. Sneaky athlete who is more shifty and elusive than he looks. Good strength. Productive. Has special teams potential. Playmaker.


Does not have great timed speed and is not very quick or explosive and lacks a burst. Will struggle to separate in the pros. Reluctant to work the middle of the field and is not very tough (plays smaller than he is). He won't do much after the catch. Not a vertical threat. Average blocker. Battled drops earlier in his career.

His uncle is former Gator and NFL wideout Wes Chandler. Will always be held back by the speed factor. Could be a nice possession receiver / redzone threat.

15. Brandon Myles - 6000, 189, 4.41, West Virginia

A riser with a great program from a blue collar family who really instilled a solid work ethic in him. Surprisingly was not invited to the combine despite the fact that he undoubtedly would have shown very well there. Brandon's height/speed ratio is among the very best in the draft. Has an outstanding 38" vertical to top that off. A true deep threat in the making who has not worked with a stud deep-throwing QB. He has become a better pass catcher over his collegiate career as well. No longer body catches. Worker, good student, "yes sir" attitude. Very effective in the red zone. Made his senior year his best. With an elite pocket passer at QB it is scary to think what he might have acoomplished statistically...but do not be fooled by the stats. The guy can flat out play the game!

Not a great hands guy. Still has work to do on technique. Needs to be quicker out of his breaks. Needs to polish his routes. Fairly old. Drops some catchable balls, but will make an acrobatic grab on the next play--i.e. consistency still has a ways to go. Just needs reps and pro coaching to become special.

2nd round talent, who will probably slide some due to the offense he played in and the fact that he was not invited to the combine
He also recorded a 35 ½-inch vertical, a 10-foot-11 broad, a 4.31 short shuttle and a 6.98 three-cone drill.

16. Paul Williams - 6013, 205, 4.45, Fresno State

Paul really has everything you look for from a physical tools standpoint. A terrific athlete with good speed and ideal size with long arms, on a solid frame. A strong and physical guy who plays big with adequate hands. Great leaper with excellent ball skills and body control. Deep threat who can stretch the field vertically. Elusive and runs well after the catch. Plays faster than he times. Still has a lot of upside.

Underachiever who doesn't play up to his potential. Raw and needs to work on his technique and master the nuances of the position. Needs to become a better route runner. Average as a blocker. Will have lapses in concentration and drop some balls

The type who could end up being a better pro than college player if the light ever comes on. Intriguing prospect who will more than likely get chosen earlier than his play would warrant thanks to his vast potential and measurables.

17. Courtney Taylor - 6016, 204, 4.50 Auburn

Courtney was definitely overshadowed by future pros like Ben Obomanu, Anthony Mix and Devin Aromashodu at times throughout his career but he might end up being the best prospect of the bunch. A good natural athlete with excellent size and a solid build. Great body control and ball skills. Will make some spectacular catches. Tough and not afraid to work over the middle. Very physical and really knows how to use his size. Decent route runner and knows how to get open. A solid blocker. Clutch on 3rd downs. Has a lot of experience. Still has some upside.

Does not have great timed speed and will have trouble separating. Drops some balls he shouldn't due to a lack of concentration. Is not a big play or deep threat and won't stretch the field vertically. Won't do much after the catch. Could stand to get a little stronger. Durability is a minor concern. Was never real productive.

Was not always utilized in college and was at his best as a sophomore but bounced back from a poor 2005 campaign and had a nice senior season. Not a true #1 target in the NFL but should at the very least be able to contribute as a possession guy.

Mike Walker - 6016, 209, 4.35, Central Florida

Mike comes into the NFL draft after a fantastic combine where he blazed a 4.35 40 and worked out extremely well in other areas. Great size and a solid frame for the position. A smooth natural athlete that runs sharp routes and finds the open pocket. Excellent leaper with terrific body control and ball skills (Displays superb focus and reliable hands). Catches ball with hands and won't body catch Tough player who will work in traffic and across the middle and sacrifices for the good of his team.

Is still learning receiver as bounced back and forth between wideout and cornerback the first two years of his career. Level of competition was okay. Game speed is much slower than timed and he may struggle to separate at the next level. Needs to get stronger and be more physical. Can still improve as a blocker. He tore his ACL at the end of the 2005 season and has battled injuries, including missing 2 games in 06.

Walker is a unique blend of size, speed, and game intelligence. He went from a late 2nd day, undrafted free agent, into the earlier parts of day 2. projects as more of an Underrated possession receiver in the pros and could be a nice #2 or #3 option.

Notes:
Mike Walker, WR, Central Florida: Entering the Combine as a late-round prospect known more for his steady, unspectacular production than his athleticism, Walker turned in perhaps the most stunning 40 time with a 4.35. The 6-foot-2, 209-pound receiver doesn't play to this speed on film, but after making the transition to wide receiver from cornerback only two years ago, Walker's eye-popping time speaks to his upside.
Walker ran exceptional routes and caught everything in sight during receiving drills. If the flu bug were floating around that day, he would have caught it. He was very sure-handed.
One receiver's coach said, "He looked as good as any of the top receivers in the draft." That would explain why the San Diego Chargers were out in full force.

A former corner

Walker led the team in interceptions with three picks while playing corner his sophomore year at Central Florida. Not surprising since his primary position in high school was cornerback.
Walker made the switch to receiver once he entered college. He credits former wide receivers coach D.J. McCarthy, who coached him for two years before moving on to UCLA and now LSU, with his development.
At 6-foot-2, 210 pounds, Walker is a well-built receiver with outstanding speed and quickness. He's a big-play receiver who is physical and will go up to catch a pass in heavy traffic. Walker is a good route runner and possesses a nice pair of mitts. He is very intelligent and will use his knowledge of playing corner to out think defenders covering him to get open.

Under the radar

Walker has drawn comparisons to Houston Texans WR Andre Johnson. Coincidently, the Texans are another team with designs on Walker.
Walker had been flying under the radar for a number of reasons. One reason being is he's coming off a season-ending knee injury suffered in the final regular-season game in '05, which gave cause for some concerns. Another reason is scouts had him down as running in the 4.5 range in the 40, but Walker quickly eased concerns about the knee when he scorched the track at the combine and left scouts flabbergasted by the performance.
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Old 04-19-2007, 12:37 PM   #4
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18. Jacoby Jones - 6025, 210, 4.50, Lane University

Jones has prototypical NFL size and the frame to get bigger. A smooth natural athlete with good timed speed and terrific quickness. Explosive off the snap and eats up a cushion and is an outstanding leaper who will high point the ball. Vertical threat who can stretch the field. Plays faster than he times? Good vision in the open field and is elusive after the catch. Will be able to contribute as a return man.

Did not play against elite competition. Still very raw and will need a lot of work when it comes to the nuances of the position. Doesn't run great routes. Is not very physical and won't work over the middle much. Needs to bulk up and get stronger. Sub par blocker. Does not have real big hands and will drop some balls. Needs to display better concentration. Takes too many chances as a return man.

He did not play much football at the prep level and accepted a track scholarship to Southeastern Louisiana out of high school in 2002 before transferring to Lane in 2003. Over the course of his career, and during this off-season, he has shown exceptional speed and quickness and has done exactly what any small-school wide out has to do when given the chance to play against DI competition. He caught everything thrown his way. Should be one of the top sleepers available this year.

Notes:
...Also ran track and played basketball at Lane...One of the standouts of the East / West Shrine game, just like Marques Colston was a year ago...Has all the physical tools you look for...Jacoby Jones from Lane didn’t stand out like I thought he would. On film he really impresses me. He didn’t do badly though. He measured in at 6’ 2.5” 210 pounds and ran a respectable 4.55 second 40 yard dash. He also had a very good 10’ 9” broad jump.

19. Rhema McKnight - 6012, 211 4.54, Notre Dame

One of the most prolific receivers in Fightin' Irish history. Naturally athletic that has good size and a solid frame. Good body control and ball skills. Has strong and reliable hands. Good route runner that is tough and works across the middle. Great blocker who gives an excellent effort. More quick than fast. Smart and a hard worker with top intangibles.

Concentration will lapse at times. Timed speed is adequate but certainly not special. Could improve his conditioning and strength. Needs to keep his weight in check. Does not offer any value as a return man. Has some health and durability concerns

Benefited from never really being the focal point of defenses attention.
Missed most of the 2005 season and redshirted after tearing his right ACL. The type who does everything well but nothing great. Projects as a nice #2 or #3 target at the next level and a solid contributor.

20. Laurent Robinson - 6020, 199, 4.38, Illinois State

In comparing Robinson to other small school wide outs on this list, one thing stands out about Robinson; his speed. He's probably one of the ten fastest WRs in the draft. That alone will keep him on NFL radars. But what will really help him is if he can go to the NFL Scouting Combine and show the consistency from his junior season (86 receptions, 1,465 yards, 12 TDs) and not the up and down play that plagued him this past season. He's got great size and leaping ability, and like I said, he can flat out run. Runs real good routes and he just knows how to get open. Athletic and quick. A good leaper with great ball skills and body control. Catches the ball well and is vertical threat

Did not play against elite competition and will have to make a big transition. Not very strong or physical and his toughness has been questioned. Sub par blocker. Fumbler? Must be more conscious of securing the ball before heading up field.

Of course with WR being a premium position, guys like Robinson will be drafted on measurables and potential alone. Robinson has plenty of both. Ankle injury during the 2006 season.

21. David Ball - 6007, 196, 4.70, New Hampshire

Ball has really come on strong this past season. Even before his off-season started, he was opening NFL Scouts eyes with his knack for making clutch catches and big plays. He's got very good size, nice speed and his route running and hands are top notch. Aggressive and will go up and get the ball, showing solid body control and ball skills. Tough and will work the middle. Ball plays with a ton of energy and enthusiasm and works hard on the field and at practice. Smart

Dominated a low level of competition and will be making a big leap. Does not have very good timed speed, quickness or a burst, so he will struggle to separate and won't do much after the catch. Needs to get stronger.

Wide receiver is an interesting spot because if you can get separation, run solid routes and catch what's thrown at you, you can play in the NFL, and Ball can do all three. Ball is the player who broke several of Jerry Rice's records at the 1AA level. He was also a high jumper for the UNH track team. Fantastic college player who just doesn't project well to the next level. A #4 or #5 option at best.

22. Chansi Stuckey - 5105, 197, 4.49, Clemson

Began his college career as a quarterback before moving to wide receiver as a sophomore. Naturally athletic that has very good speed and quickness with a burst. Runs well after the catch and is elusive and is tough to tackle in the open field. Has pretty good hands. Can be a dangerous weapon on reverses and trick plays. Also a top return man. Hard worker with good intangibles. Still developing and has some upside.

Raw and is still learning the position. Doesn't run great routes. Does not have either the ideal height or bulk that you look for nor is he very strong or physical. May be limited to a backup/return specialist role at the next level. Durability is a concern.

Was having a great senior campaign but missed some time with a broken foot. Intriguing prospect who needs to show he can stay healthy. Jack-of-all-trades who may never be a star but could contribute in a number of ways.

23. Joel Filani - 6021, 211, 4.63, Texas Tech

Joel has been overshadowed by his teammate Jarrett Hicks but he had a better 2006 season and emerged as the superior pro prospect. A good athlete that has very good size with great height, long arms and a solid frame. Excellent balls skills and a good leaper. Has decent hands. Tough, strong and physical. Can be a weapon in the red zone. Pretty good blocker. Hard worker. Has special teams potential.

Played in an offense that padded his stats. Timed speed and quickness are only average. Does not run great routes. Will have trouble separating and won't be a vertical threat. Does not do much after the catch. Has a limited overall upside.

Very good college player who probably won't be much more than a #4 option and a possession guy in the pros.


24. Vincent Marshall - 5075, 165, 4.37, Houston

Vincent is a true speed demon who also competes in track for the UH track team. But, do not label him a "track star who plays football", but rather a "football star who runs track." Very quick in short areas as well. Deadly on swing passes out of the backfield or on bubble screens. Versatility is a huge plus, as he can do it all on the football field, and do it all well. Great leadership abilities and terrific character, both on and off the field.
Short and small. May have difficulty withstanding punishment at the next level if used incorrectly. Hands are good, but not great. Still learning to return punts, and is not yet an aggresive punt returner.

He is one of the finest people you will ever meet, and will do whatever it takes to help a team. Began punt returning for the first time in 2006, and did well, but finally convinced the coaching staff to let him return kicks in the 2006. If you are drafting for football players, Vincent is your guy.

25. Steve Breaston - 6003, 193, 4.41, Michigan

Burst onto the scene as a freshman but despite a solid senior campaign he was never really able to recapture that glory. Adequate size and bulk. Quick, elusive and agile with a burst. A versatile weapon on trick plays and reverses. Great vision and can be a terror in the open field. Terrific return man. Big play threat with lots of experience.

Durability is a concern. Does not work the middle of the field. Average route runner that is not very strong or physical. Has trouble beating the jam. Will drop some catchable balls. Blocking needs work.

Probably profiles as a #4 or #5 wideout and return specialist at the next level. He is not nearly the pro prospect that his college hype would lead you to believe and he's been a bit of an underachiever.
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Old 04-19-2007, 12:39 PM   #5
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26. Chris Davis - 5102, 182, 4.56, Florida St.

Another very gifted and versatile athlete, Davis has great open field speed and big play potential. He is a stout, compact wide receiver that is surprisingly strong and has very good hands and will make some spectacular grabs. Great quickness and runs good routes.Will work the middle of the field. He gives a good effort as a blocker. Might have some special teams potential as a punt returner.

Frail and doesn't have the bulk you look for. Needs to get stronger. Height is only average. Is not much of a vertical deep threat. Lacks elite timed speed. Has some durability concerns. Upside is limited.

It could be argued that he was not properly used at Florida State on offense. Tore his ACL in '02 and redshirted as a freshman. He still possesses great physical tools and could potentially become a solid NFL wide receiver. Could make a team as a #4 wideout and return man.

Notes:
Was a very highly regarded recruit coming out of high school......With all of Florida State's problems on offense last season, it was easy to overlook Davis. However, the 5-10, 181-pound Davis showcased the burst, good route-running and fearlessness at the Senior Bowl to emerge as one of the better slot receivers in the draft. Davis, while not a classic speed threat, ran a solid 4.50 at the Combine, and demonstrated his rare quickness and agility, finishing second among all receivers in the shuttle (4.14) and third in the three cone drill (6.66).

27. Jordan Kent - 6041, 221, 4.49, Oregon

Jordan has outstanding height and bulk with long arms. He is a tremendous natural athlete. A long strider with decent speed.but is a phenomenal leaper. Smart and a hard worker w/ top intangibles. Showed big improvement in a short time.

Extremely raw. Has very little experience. Not really physical and may lack a football player's mentality. Hands are just average. Will need a lot of work from a technique standpoint. Not a good route runner. Might literally be years away.

Notes:
Was born in Saudi Arabia...Played basketball for the Ducks and his father, Ernie, is the head basketball coach...For the most part he had been known as a track and basketball star and he actually excelled in both sports at the high school and college levels...Opted to give football a try in 2005 and in doing so he became the first NCAA athlete to letter in three sports since 2002...Didn't see much action on the gridiron in high school...An extremely intriguing prospect who may get drafted based on upside alone...Whoever brings him into the fold will have to be willing to invest a lot of time and effort in him but in the end it could pay major dividends.

Just oozes potential

28. James Jones - 6006, 207, 4.59, San Jose State

James is an emerging prospect who really had a breakout season as a senior in 2006. Has adequate height and pretty good bulk. Tough, strong and physical player that will work the middle of the field. Aggressive with excellent ball skills and has very good hands. Is more quick than fast but he is a great leaper. Can contribute on special teams in a number of roles. Still has some potential. Gamer who'll step up when it counts. Can also long snap

Lacks elite timed speed and will probably struggle to separate. He's not a vertical or deep threat nor will he do much after the catch. Plays too tall and slows down to cut. Concentration is key. Only an average return man
Has steadily moved up draft boards. He profiles as a backup but could be more. Still underrated but he could be a pleasant surprise for someone. Is he a one year wonder?

Jones (6-1, 204 pounds) looked good catching the ball during receiver drills. He also ran his 40s in 4.59 and 4.59 and had 35-inch vertical jump, 10-foot-6 long jump and 21 bench presses.

29. Ryne Robinson - 5091, 179, 4.47, Miami (OHIO)

This Redhawk wide receiver has been returning punts, kicks and making plays in the passing game for a very long time in the MAC conference. He is one of the best punt return men in college football last year in terms of career achievements. More quick than fast and has a burst. Runs crisp routes.Excellent hands and he'll make the spectacular catch.He is elusive after the catch and in the open field. Robinson is small but he is an aggressive football player that is not afraid to go up and get a football in traffic or take a gamble to make a big play in the return game. An outstanding punt returner who'll really be able to contribute on special teams. A versatile weapon. Tough and a hard worker with top intangibles.

Shorter than you'd prefer and lacks ideal bulk. Timed speed is only average. Does not have great strength and will struggles to beat the jam. He will not do much in the middle of the field. Gives a good effort but he will always be a sub par blocker. He has never focused strictly on football. He does not really have a lot of upside.

Overshadowed by Martin Nance for most of his career but really stepped up as a senior...Probably won't ever be a starter but he can be a adequate slot or #4 option at wideout as well as an excellent return specialist.

30.Yamon Figurs - 5112, 174, 4.30, Kansas State

Has phenomenal speed with terrific quickness and a burst. Runs well after the catch and can be a terror in the open field. An outstanding special teamer and return man. Hard worker with good intangibles. Has potential and a intriguing upside.

Does not have great bulk and is a bit frail. Drops too many balls and needs to run better routes. Still pretty raw and needs to work on mastering the nuances of the position. Not very physical and doesn't like contact. Durability is a concern.

Notes:
Nickname is "Yo"...Raced Devin Hester in track as a prep and beat him...Transfer from Garden City Community College...Really made a name for himself by running the fastest forty at the Scouting Combine...With the emphasis teams are putting on special teams these days he could go higher than you'd expect...Won't ever be a star but he could develop into a decent #3 or #4 receiver and top return man.
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Old 04-19-2007, 12:41 PM   #6
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Syvelle Newton - 6006, 218, 4.73, South Carolina

He began his career at quarterback. Moved to receiver in 2005 and then played wideout, quarterback and even safety as a senior. A terrific natural athlete. Extremely versatile and could project to multiple positions. Quick and plays faster than he times. Runs real well after the catch and in the open field. Has a good arm and good hands.Team player. Still has some potential.
Very raw and has never been able to focus on mastering a single position.

Has some major character concerns that could keep him off draft boards. Does not have a true pro position. Shaky ball security. Durability?

Arrested for larceny in 2004 and then assaulted the South Carolina student body president in 2005. Tore his Achilles tendon in '05. A developmental guy with talent but he probably won't ever be more than a backup and long-term his best fit might ultimately be in the defensive backfield at safety.

Jarrett Hicks - 6027, 210 4.67 Texas Tech

Has good size and a solid frame. Smooth natural athlete. Knows how to use his size to his advantage. Has good hands. Strong. Good leaper with excellent ball skills and body control. Tough and he'll work the middle of the field. Productive.

Timed speed and quickness are well below average. Not a vertical threat and will struggle to separate. Limited after the catch. Doesn't run good routes. His work ethic and intelligence are questionable.

He missed a good portion of the 2006 season due to academic problems and injuries. His stats were inflated due to the Red Raiders offense and he is not nearly the prospect they'd lead you to believe.

Matt Trannon - 6060, 216, 4.47 Michigan State

An outstanding athlete that has terrific size and a big frame. Decent timed speed and a phenomenal leaper who is a real threat on jump balls and in the red zone. Good body control and ball skills. Very strong and powerful. Still has a lot of potential.

Does not run good routes or know how to get open. Work ethic and intelligence are question marks. Hands and focus are shaky. Lacks toughness and he may not have a football player's mentality. Marginal blocker. Does very little after the catch. Has some trouble staying healthy. Might have to make a position change.

Played basketball for the Spartans. Could also bulk up and project to tight end. Has some physical tools to develop and might be worth a late round flyer in hopes that he will thrive once totally focused on the gridiron.

Legedu Naanee - 6022, 225, 4.41, Boise State

Began his college career as a quarterback. Has excellent size and bulk. Very athletic, strong and physical. Very good timed speed and is a long-strider with outstanding leaper skills. Has good hands. Hard worker with good intangibles. Extremely versatile. Has lots of upside.

Still raw and needs to refine his technique. Not a great route runner. Not very quick and doesn't play quite as fast as he times. Does not provide much running after the catch. Still probably a couple of years away.

A interesting prospect who certainly has excellent triangle numbers. Owns a number of wide receiver and quarterback records in the weight room. A late round developmental type who could surprise.

Ryan Moore - 6022, 217, 4.54, Miami

Has terrific size and bulk. Adequate timed speed, Great athlete that runs very good routes. Strong and physical. A outstanding leaper with great ball skills and body control. Pretty good hands and is willing to work the middle of the field. Still has upside.

Character and attitude are major concerns. Was never overly productive. Needs to show better concentration. Durability is a question mark. Is not really a deep or vertical threat. A classic underachiever who doesn't play up to his talent level.

Has run into trouble off-the-field with team a team suspension and then an arrest for criminal mischief and simple battery. Seems to have all the physical tools you look for and could surprise if he can get his act together. He could be worth a late round flyer.

Syndric Steptoe - 5085, 194, 4.59, Arizona

Played under tough circumstances with a poor offense in college. A good athlete that is more quick than fast. Yet is explosive with great change of direction. He runs good routes. Has solid hands. Elusive and tough to bring down in the open field. A terrific return man who will contribute on special teams. Top intangibles.

Undersized and does not have the height you look for. Is not very strong or physical. Has some durability concerns. Not a vertical or deep threat. Probably has a limited upside.

Has experience as a kick and punt returner and that's where he will have to make his mark at the next level. Slot guy who at best could possibly develop into a Bobby Wade-type.

D'Juan Woods - 6004, 208 4.60 Oklahoma State

Has good size and bulk. Strong and physical. Excellent hands and will make the acrobatic catch. Great ball skills and body control. Adjusts to and tracks the ball well. Great leaper. Good blocker. Will make tough catches in traffic.

Timed speed and quickness are very average. He can do a better job as a route runner. Will struggle to separate. He'll have trouble getting vertical against pro corners. Needs to improve his focus and concentration. Limited after the catch.

Brother Rashaun was a 1st round pick of the San Francisco 49'ers in 2004...Other brother, Donovan, is a safety at Oklahoma State...Is 3rd all-time on the Cowboys receiving charts behind only his brother Rashaun and Hart Lee Dykes...Not nearly the prospect that Rashaun was...Has a chance to make it as a possession type.
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Old 04-19-2007, 12:43 PM   #7
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Aaron Fairooz - 6056, 209, 4.49, Central Arkansas

Has excellent size with long arms and the frame to get bigger. Steady, reliable hands. .Knows how to use his body. Great leaper with good timing who will high point the ball. Great ball skills and body control. Can be a terror in the red zone

Did not play against elite competition. Timed speed is only average. Will struggle to separate against pro cornerbacks. Not overly quick and lacks a burst. Doesn't work the middle of the field well. Offers little after the catch. A marginal blocker.

Good sleeper who was productive at his level but may not have the physical tools to adjust to the pro game. He will more than likely get an opportunity to work in someone's camp but does not profile as anything more than a #4 or #5 wideout.

Roy Hall - 6030, 230, 4.38, Ohio State

Has great size and terrific bulk with long arms. Knows how to use his body. Strong and physical. Hands are pretty good. Outstanding timed speed. Can run after the catch. Above average blocker. Smart with solid intangibles. Still has upside

An underachiever who doesn't play up to his physical tools. Does not play as fast as he times and isn't real quick. Does not run great routes. May have to make a position change. Limited starting experience.

Could project to and get looks as a tight end or H-Back at the next level. He was not invited to the Combine but tore it up at his Pro Day. Someone just may take a flyer on him based on potential alone. Intriguing and a classic workout warrior.

"He's a kid that will be on people's radar now,"

Vincent Marshall - 5073, 165, 4.33, Houston

Blessed with deceptive quickness in the open field and outstanding speed, Marshall is a big play wide receiver despite his small size. He can take a short pass and break it into a big play at any moment. Depending on how he does at the combine he could potentially climb his way into being a first day selection, Marshall is a very talented wide receiver.

Scott Mayle
Also, former Bobcat wide receiver missed Pro Day due to track, but make no mistake about it -- this Cat can flat out fly! He never put up the big numbers we expected him to in football, but we think he might be able to stick at the next level as a kick returner, at least. He has a chance to be drafted, between rounds 5 and 7, but it's possible he could slip through cracks and be a priority free agent.

Chris McFoy - 6010, 200, 4.59, USC

McFoy is one of the more interesting and unproven wide receivers in this draft. McFoy has been fortunate enough to play with special quarterbacks and be on national champion teams at USC, but unfortunate at the same time, playing the same position as Keary Colbert, Mike Williams, Dwayne Jarrett, and Steve Smith during his time at USC. Chris McFoy is as steady as they come. You know what he is going to give you on every play, and that is everything he he has. He has a solid frame, and shows the strength and toughness to go over the middle and take a hit and hold on to the football. McFoy also has the ability to come out of his breaks quick enough to gain separation and when the ball is within his grasp, he catches it every time. He also does the little things that do not get the attention. McFoy is a very good blocker for a wideout, and has played on special teams for the Trojans.
While you know the good you are getting with McFoy, you also know what not to expect. He lacks the standout physical ability to be a true playmaker. He does not possess great speed or quickness, and will not be able to make big plays in the NFL on a consistent basis.

Chris McFoy is not a player you want to peg as a future starter, but he is a player who can help your football team. He can be a solid intermediate threat for teams as a fourth wideout, and his ability on special teams allows him to make an impact in another way outside of catching the football.

He has very good raw talent and has not really got a chance to show his real potential yet. He has played only sparingly at USC but he has shown flashes of potential for awhile. McFoy is a big kid, runs good routes and seems to have soft hands as well. Look for him to be a solid pickup for a team in the later rounds.

Carl Berman - 5091, 166, 4.32, Indiana State

He is listed as high as a 5th in some mocks yet I can not find a thing on him. Well for free that is. any help out there?

Johnathan Holland - 5118, 191, 4.45 La. Tech

Very athletic with good timed speed. Has adequate size and long arms. Does a good job of getting off the line. Good strength. Solid ball skills. Also has a lot of special teams potential

His hands are shaky. Not as quick as you'd expect. Not overly elusive and can do a better job as a route runner. Is not much of a blocker. Focus and concentration are lacking at times. Pretty raw.

He's a bit of an enigma and he probably should have been more productive when you consider his physical tools, the level of competition and the type of offense he played in. A decent developmental guy.

Chandler Williams - 5108, 184, 4.42 FIU

Has very good timed speed and quickness. Height is adequate and runs well after the catch. Very athletic with superb hands. Good body control. Tough and strong. Will beat the jam. Can also help out as a return man. He still has some potential.


Did not play against top competition on a consistent basis. He does not have the ideal bulk that you look for. A sub par blocker and needs to run better routes. Raw and he'll likely need quite a bit of work. Is he ever going to be starting material?

An interesting developmental prospect who may never be a star but could make a roster and eventually contribute some day.

Jesse Holley - 6020, 219, 4.65, North Carolina

Has good size and a solid frame. Very athletic with reliable hands. Knows how to get open. Smart with good awareness. Physical and aggressive. Nice body control and ball skills. Excellent leaper. Above average blocker.Solid intangibles.

Does not have great timed speed. Lacks explosiveness and a burst. Is not much a route runner. Does not provide much after the catch. Upside may be limited in the pros.

Notes:
A member of the 2005 National Champion UNC basketball team as a walk-on and played in 10 basketball games while scoring 13 points. Played on some bad Tar Heel teams. At best he's a backup/possession guy.

Jayson Swain - 6003, 212, 4.63, Tennessee

Good size and bulk. He has good strength and will work the middle of the field and can be productive in traffic. Has pretty good hands. Aggressive and a great leaper.Very athletic. Nice focus and concentration.
He is not really a vertical or deep threat or provide much in terms of running after the catch. Mediocre as a blocker. He probably doesn't have a big upside.

Has some physical tools to work with but was somewhat of an underachiever in college He will get his shot to make it at the next level but even in a best-case scenario he'll likely never be anything more than a #4 or #5 option or camp body.
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Old 04-19-2007, 12:46 PM   #8
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Mike Mason - 5115, 190, 4.31 Tennessee State

Has great timed speed and extremely quick with a burst. A deep vertical threat. He changes directions well and is elusive in the open field. Decent ball skills with very good hands. His size and bulk are adequate. Can also contribute as a return man.

Character, maturity and attitude are major question marks. He was never overly productive. Is not very strong or physical and will struggles to beat the jam. A marginal blocker. Lacks toughness and hears footsteps. Just might have a limited upside.

Played most of his career at North Carolina until he was dismissed from the team due to off-the-field transgressions. He definitely has some tools to work with and you can't teach speed. Needs to keep is head on straight to even have a chance.

John Broussard - 6006, 176, 4.38, San Jose State

Explosive receiver who flashes the ability to stretch the defense. Displays a good sense of timing, offers the quarterback a nice target and consistently extends to make the reception away from his frame. Has a burst of speed and solid open-field running skills.

Does not always come away with the difficult catch and loses out in battles against larger opponents. Marginally productive on the college level.

After a promising junior campaign, Broussard was unable to capitalize or take his game to another level last year. His speed will help him get into a camp next summer, where he must produce on special teams.

Drisan James - 6000, 193, 4.55, Boise St.

Adequate height. A vertical and deep threat. Does a good job of getting off the line. Very athletic with good hand-eye coordination and ball skills. Terrific leaper.and a elusive playmaker. Displays nice body control. Aggressive & goes after the ball.

Needs to add some bulk. Speed and quickness are nothing special. A mediocre route runner that is not real physical and lacks toughness. Doesn't do much after the catch. Hands are shaky. Doesn't work the middle. Has some attitude concerns.

Notes:
Was overshadowed at times by Legedu Naanee and Jerard Rabb. Has some tools to work with and did a nice job considering his opportunities were somewhat limited. May be able to stick as a #4 or #5 guy.

Derek Stanley - 5099, 172, 4.45, Wisconsin-Whitewater

Has terrific timed speed. Elusive and runs well after the catch...A big play threat who is a good leaper. Has decent hands. Has experience as a return man. Has lots of special teams potential.

Undersized and doesn't have either the ideal height of bulk you look for. Did not play against top competition and will be making a huge leap. Not a great route runner and needs to work on his technique. Probably more of a long-term project.

Was a man amongst boys at the Division III level. Also played a little defense in college. He could be a real interesting developmental guy. Profiles as more of a backup or slot receiver and return specialist in the pros. A nice sleeper prospect.

Onrea Jones - 5111, 202, 4.42, Hampton

He plays faster than he times and has good size and toughness. Onrea Jones, WR, from Hampton has the West Coast receiver with attractive 6'2" 202 height Weight package.

Not very quick Onrea Jones looks like a possession receiver who has deceptive build up speed to occasionally burn tight coverage. He is still raw in terms of routes and reading coverage.

Based purely on his measurables and most of his production: 2006 - 32-631-19.7-2 in 2005. 7-49-7.0 in 2004, 2003 [was missed due to academics]

Lorenzo Hoffman - 6064,216, 4.68, Alabama State

short shuttle in 4.45 seconds and the three-cone drill in 7.43 seconds. He measured a 31-inch vertical jump, a 9-foot-5 broad jump and completed 13 repetitions on the 225-pound bench press.

Marquay McDaniel - 5106, 205, 4.58, Hampton

A smooth athlete that i very athletic. A terrific route runner that is more quick than fast with great change of direction. Elusive and has a burst. Great hands. A hard worker and team leader with top intangibles. Solid blocker. Can return kicks and punts.

Size is only average. Timed speed is nothing special. Needs to get stronger. Will get jammed at the line. Is not a deep threat. His upside may be limited. Didn't play against elite competition.

The type who does most everything well but nothing great. Will never be a star in the NFL but could make a roster and contribute as a backup wideout. His most significant contributions might come on special teams. Profiles as a slot receiver.

Jeff Samardzija - 6-5, 216, 4.50, Notre Dame
Worth a last round pick just incase.

Brad Ekwerekwu - 6036, 209 4.48 Missouri (TE/WR)

A long strider who is deadly after the cacth. Very fluid. A very good athlete with great hands.

Display good open field speed and looked a little sluggish trying to get downfield at times. Has not yet grasping the subtlities of using his size, speed, and leaping ability..

Played slot, WR and TE.

short shuttle in 4.02 and the three-cone drill in 6.78. He had a 37½-inch vertical jump, a 10-foot-6 broad jump and 17 bench presses.

Julius McClellan - 6035, 246, 4.56, North Carolina Central

He also had a 32-inch vertical jump, 9-foot-3 long jump, 7.84 three-cone drill and 14 bench presses.
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